The futility of the death-proof

Here’s a question: would an infinite lifespan change the way we do things – our day-to-day activities? Our motivations, outlooks and reactions? Or are we prone to being short-sighted by our very human nature? Today’s Daily Post prompt imagines that [I’ve] imbibed a special potion that makes [me] immortal. Now that [I’ve] got forever, what changes will [I] make in [my] life? How will [I] live life differently, knowing [I’ll] always be around to be accountable for [my] actions?

First of all I would like to thank Starbucks, who didn’t sponsor my post or anything but did have the exquisite taste to release a CD in their stores called Big Waves: Five Decades of Surf Rock for $12.95. I picked up a copy, and just looking at the track listing, I would have to say it’s a pretty good selection; if anyone wants a surf CD to blast in the car, they could do much worse. Just skip the first track if you prefer instro like I do.

So back to the question at hand. Now that I’m pretty much guaranteed to live forever, how does that change things? In the short term, which is like now but forever, it doesn’t change anything. I still have to work, I still have to pay the bills, and I still have a family to support. And unless I manage to get rich, that’s what I can look forward to as long as that is the status quo.

Over the long term, I’m not so sure. I’d probably become more patient and compassionate over time, as time tends to do to those who age gracefully, and I wouldn’t be as codgery as those who become jealous of youth, and how it’s wasted on the young, because I would be myself frozen in an arguably later youth. Sadly, I would outlive my wife and then my kids, and then my grandchildren too. At some point I might take up international travel, as my home would be paid for and I would amass a small fortune in savings. I might take several months off to tour Europe, Africa, Australia, and Indonesia. I’d learn their languages. I would devote myself to figuring out how interpersonal connections evolve in the world and then attempt to mitigate the factors that push us away from each other. Maybe I’d join a monastery for a few decades, learn Kung-fu, become a Unitarian priest, do humanitarian work with the Peace Corps, become a politician and strive for world peace.

Or… I don’t know. Maybe I’d just hang out.

How about you? Let us know in the comments!

What would other bloggers do?

11 thoughts on “The futility of the death-proof”

  1. Could you imagine having to live forever? Without the guarantee that those I love would live as well, and there would be quality….nope. I am a quality over quality gal. Plus, I am incredibly clumsy, immortal and clumsy would mean monstrous medical bills. 😉

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